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Georges St-Pierre: Anderson Silva had 'biological weapon', it's cheating

Former UFC champ Georges St-Pierre says Anderson Silva shouldn't have been allowed to compete with a 'biological weapon'.

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Georges St-Pierre spoke more about Anderson Silva's recent drug test failure, and the former UFC champion has since equated those PED's to fighting with a 'biological weapon'. According to the Canadian Press, GSP says that Silva should never have been allowed to compete at UFC 183 after failing his pre-fight drug test:

The fight should be cancelled because it's cheating, it's a biological weapon that you have. If I fight someone with a knife and the promoter and the organization know I have a knife. I'm bringing a knife into the fight, they should not let me fight because I'm carrying a weapon.

"A performance-enhancing drug is the same thing, it's a biological weapon. It's an advantage that you have over your opponent that you should not be able to compete with. Because you put the health of the competitor in jeopardy.

"We're not playing golf, we're not racing, we're fighting. Every time we fight we put our lives, our well-being in jeopardy."

St-Pierre says he "feels very sad for Anderson Silva", and also noted that he'd rather speak about the main problem with the testing process rather than talk bad about the middleweight champ:

"I don't want to talk about one individual, I want to talk about the system. The system is a big problem in the sport of mixed martial arts. It's something that I believe the UFC and fighters should confront and deal with it. Because if you don't deal with it right now, it's going to get worse and worse and worse."

According to GSP, the athletic commissions took a step forward by doing more random testing, but they "still have a lot of room for improvement" and MMA should switch to Olympic style drug testing:

"(The Olympics) have random testing and the testing is done by a competent and an independent organization (the World Anti-Doping Association) that has no interest financially in the promotion of (the sport)"

State athletic commissions of course take a certain percentage of the earnings from events under their jurisdiction, and by all accounts, UFC 183 ended up doing big business as the headliner wasn't cancelled. Whether the two are related or not, this is part of why St-Pierre and a few others have been insisting on "an independent and competent organization" to oversee the testing instead.